Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Sep 19

The ProjektList 9-19-22

Steve Roach feature article at the Moog Music website.

Few can claim such accolades in composition as Steve. Boasting several Grammy nominations and a body of work that helped to define the golden age of analog synthesis, Steve’s catalog spans over 100 solo albums, live recordings, and collaborations. He is still composing to this day, adding to his impressive catalog and inspiring the world of ambient music.

A revamp of Steve’s 2004 Space And Time album is name-your-price at Steve’s Bandcamp page. We’ve added extended excerpts & extra tracks. Essentials 1984 — 2004 Space and Time invites the listener on a 90-minute journey into the extraordinary electronic soundworlds of Steve Roach.

👉 Black Tape For A Blue Girl vocalist Jon DeRosa’s band is Aarktica. Jon created something special for Projekt fans. Aarktica Mixtape V.1 – The Early Influences is “a playlist that highlights some of my early influences, artists and composers who I was listening to a lot of in the early days and who influenced Aarktica’s sound in the No Solace in Sleep era. This is by no means a comprehensive list, but it does include some great artists. Enjoy!” Playlist streaming at Spotify.

👉 theAdelaidean (in literary mode, as Sean Williams) has a new book out; Honour Among Ghosts is available from Allen & Unwin. It is a “sidequel” to his multi-nominated novel Her Perilous Mansion for readers aged 10-up. theAdelaidean is also part of a massive Kickstarter for four new anthologies from the legendary small press Zombie Needs Brains. You can learn more about that, and his music, by watching this short video interview with Sean.

👉 Projekt’s Peter Phippen posted a 90-second video at YouTube Antique Egyptian Kamala Improvisation. And he’ll be performing October 2 at Kinstone Circle in Fountain City, WI. Peter Phippen (Antique bamboo flutes) with Victoria Shoemaker (djembe / wooden flutes).) It’s a natural acoustic performance.

👉 Erik Wøllo is finishing his new album for a January 2023 release on Projekt.

👉 A memoir from Peter Ulrich: Drumming With Dead Can Dance & Parallel Adventures (Book) (PreOrder, Expected Mid-November) 6″x9″ casebound book, 295 pages.

👉 Tracks from Paulina Fae’s Glow played on Hypnagogue #364, Magnetofunky #23, The Blackout Radio Show, and Star’s End Top 50 albums for July 2022.

Thanatos Comes Alive! Acoustic shows:

Sunday, October 23 at Black Forge Coffee House II in McKees Rocks, PA Monday, October 24 at … well NOWHERE yet but we are still asking around. Tuesday, October 25 at Small’s in , Detroit, MI Wednesday October 26 at Gman Tavern in Chicago, IL. Full details at Thanatos website.

Alio Die & Dirk Serries: The chapters of the eclipse CD at the Projekt webstore

Bandcamp fan EJR wrote: “Although Dirk moved away from his keyboard rig many years ago, his effected guitar is the perfect foil for Stefano’s zither and encompassing electronics. I am blown away by the beauty of this music. These long time ambient composers have created a very special collaborative recording. Seconds after play you’ll be floating away. Thanks to Sam as always for the European ambient on Projekt.”

Listening Booth Projekt’s playlists at Spotify and Soundcloud and Pandora.

PreOrders with November 4 release date

Michael Stearns: Chronos — 2022 Remaster, Original X-86 Ambisonics Mix Forrest Fang: The Lost Seasons of Amorphia

Upcoming Projekt Release October 14 • Jarguna: My Temple 2 [Digital]

Projekt now has an Instagram. Be our friend!

thank you for supporting independent music www.projekt.com

Apr 20

Peter Phippen, “these flutes became my teachers.”

Peter Phippen, “these flutes became my teachers.”

by Patrick Ogle (photo credit: Victoria Shoemaker)

Peter Phippen picked up his first flute over 30 years ago: a small, crude bamboo penny whistle. He paid 25 cents for it.

“On and off in the 80s, I played fender bass with an avant-garde free-form improvisation group led by my mentor and University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire art professor Tiit Raid,” says Phippen. “We had a show in early March 1987, and I took the ‘new’ crude bamboo penny whistle along.”

During a conga break in one of the songs Phippen busted out the whistle while his mentor gave him the eye.

“I thought I was going to be in trouble for playing the little bamboo. But without saying a word, the next day on his way to teach, Tiit stopped by and gave me a bansuri bamboo flute from India and said, ‘Peter, if you’re going to play flute, play this.’ And that’s when it really all started,” he says.

It wasn’t too long before new flutes were placed on the altar. He was given a Japanese flute, a shakuhachi, by the flute professor at University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Tim Lane. While touring with a rock group, the band’s keyboard player found a broken bamboo flute in Louisville which he gave to the nascent flute enthusiast.

“He paid a dollar for it and gave it to me. Our next stop was St. Louis, Missouri,“ says Phippen. “I got that flute repaired, and for whatever reason that is the flute that changed everything. These three flutes became my teachers, but the old cracked and repaired one dollar alto bamboo flute more so than the others.”

Since that time, Peter has recorded 25 albums of his own improvised flute-based music. On these, he also employs four antique shakuhachi, one antique and one vintage bansuri, an antique Egyptian kawala as well as an African hunter’s whistle from Burkina Faso.

Phippen isn’t, however, trying to recreate music from the cultures of his various flutes. He is making intuitive music, his own interpretation of the instruments.

“To play just one of these instruments in a traditional manner would take a lifetime. So, my approach is very non-traditional. I play these instruments as improvisational tools to express myself musically,” he says. “I’m not playing music from the cultures the instruments are from. I improvise freely and put in a great deal of time on the instruments doing my best to get out of the way of the music that I’m channeling or allowing to flow through me out of the air. I am not trying to impress anyone with my playing; I feel my playing is simple. Yet, to play simply, these deceptively ‘simple’ instruments require constant attention.”

His goal, he says, is to play as naturally as possible and while he isn’t religious, he feels his music is spiritual rather than technical.

“Now the more technique you have, the more you can express yourself musically, so it’s a double-edged sword. One has to have technique to play free in case the unconscious flow of the music calls for that, but I feel there is no room for ego when improvising or imposing your will on the music as it is unfolding,” says Phippen. “Yes, I can play fast and all that, but I’m interested in saying something deeply meaningful with the fewest possible notes. To me it’s all about the tone and the phrasing of the notes played.”

Phippen notes that every culture on earth, excepting Australia, has an indigenous version of the flute. Each fascinates Phippen, especially antique instruments.

“I love Edo period and Meiji era Japanese shakuhachi. I also love the sound of vintage and antique bansuri and museum replicas of rim-blown flutes from the four corners area of the American southwest where the originals date from 600 to 1100 CE,” he says. “I like to play and record antique and old vintage flutes most, instruments that have been around the block a few times and have a ton of mojo.”

Curiously one flute Phippen doesn’t play is the familiar Boehm flute, but it is also interesting that before the advent of that instrument, Western flutes, too, were usually wooden.

“I do have some early 19th century wooden flutes and have recorded with them. The cylindrical Boehm flute as we know it today was introduced in 1847 and in my humble opinion is a recent development. I have seen and heard some recent contemporary wooden Boehm flutes as well,” says Phippen. “However, for my music, I find the tone of these instruments unsuitable for the music I am going for. I feel any simple system bamboo flute is superior in tone color to the Boehm silver or wooden flute as we know it today.”

He adds that a popular contemporary wooden flute maker told him he “lives behind a bamboo wall.” Phippen says, “I will always go for bamboo as my first option.” He knows the flutes made of other materials. He just gravitates toward bamboo.

“There are indigenous North American flutes, and these should be made of cedar, juniper, elderberry or box elder. There are also simple system wooden flutes from all over the world made out of various soft and hardwoods. And it seems I am a walking contradiction, as I play in a highly non-traditional manner,” he says. “Yet I like the instruments I play to be very simple and traditional in nature. Still in the end, there is something about the voice of bamboo flutes that I find intriguing, especially antique bamboo flutes.” He has three modest collections: a modern one in case he has to play in a Western pitch, antique, which may or may not play with modern instruments and a “specimen” collection.

Even though he learned to improvise on the bass first, he moved away from it once he discovered the flute. He did play bass a little on his early recordings but did so as a matter of comfort.

“I do not feel the electric bass fits on my flute music. Early on I played bass for my first Canyon Records album, Book of Dreams, but only to serve the song, as I was not full-out improvising everything in 1996, there was a loose ‘form.’ After that I avoided it.” says Phippen.

He says that this could change even though he doesn’t see it happening.

“For my music I like natural and simple instruments, folk harps, gongs, singing bowls, box zithers, female voices, and African and world percussion, all supporting or talking back and forth with my simple bamboo, wood, and clay flutes,” he says. “The only electric instruments I hear in my music are synthesizer and theremin.”

Phippen says that he doesn’t control what he plays consciously but only plays what his intuition allows him on a given day.

“In a sense the music I’m playing is ‘living.’ Now of course there will be good and bad days, but that is only natural. Such is life. If my music sounds fresh after all this time, it may be because I live to play and love the feeling when the music is flowing through me,” says Phippen. “If it sounds cohesive, perhaps that is just my musical voice playing a variation of the same thing at a different moment in time. What I do know is that I play what I am feeling on any given day, following my intuitive instinct in hopes I end up in the ‘zone,’ that place where you become a medium and natural music that has always been there in the air simply flows through you. Some would call that magic.”

His improvisational style is something he was born with – or learned quite early.

“When I was improvising as a young bassist, I used to try and fight it off. It was always easy for me to ‘just play’ off the top of my head. I would improvise alone all the time but only used this skill when I was asked to take a solo during performances. This went on for years. I probably should have done a solo bass album in hindsight. However, in early March 1987 when I accidentally found the bamboo flute (or it found me), improvising free was just the best way to play. It’s funny that it took a different instrument to open my eyes.”

A large influence on his style, although he says he didn’t realize it until he was in his 30s, was his mother.

“I grew up in the foothills of the Adirondacks in northern New York state. When I was four, five and six years old, my mother would take me on picnic lunches into the deep woods. After we were done eating we would sit quietly, and she would always ask me, ‘What do you hear?’ My mother would not settle for the easy answers like the wind in the trees or the birds singing,” says Phippen. “She took me to places where there would be much to hear if you really listened. Once the bamboo flute came into my life, all my mother had taught about really listening opened up.”

There is something of the natural world in Phippen’s music: wind whispering through the pines, the ambient hum of nature and the myriad frequencies just in the realm of what we can hear.

Phippen’s latest release, Into The Ancient, is available now at Projekt’s Bandcamp page, Spotify, Pandora, youTube and all other digital outlets.

Mar 10

lovely videos to relax to this weekend, from Projekt artists

Projekt’s artists have been creating entertainment for your eyes as well as your ears. Go to YouTube on your big living room TV and sit yourself down to lovely videos on the Projekt: Music Videos playlist. While you’re there subscribe to the playlist to get our latest clips in your recommendations. There are new videos this week from Lorenzo Montanà, Black Tape For A Blue Girl, and Erik Wøllo. Plus recent clips from Peter Phippen, Jarguna, theAdelaidean, and Steve Roach. Hit play, and enjoy! De-stress this weekend with some great music & visuals from Projekt’s artists. Take care, SamName-your-price at Bandcamp: Descent by Lorenzo Montanà & Neogene by jarguna. preOrder Planetary Unfolding CD & digital from Michael Stearns.

Dec 22

Excelsis in UK’s The Independent

Move over Santa, Baby: Why the weird festive album is going to save Christmas

Ed Power from UK’s The Independent contacted Sam for an article on non-traditional Christmas releases. One of the answers made it in. Below that is the full interview.

The original Excelsis idea was conceived in 1995 by Projekt’s Promotion Director, Patrick Ogle. Pat ghost-wrote these answers and then Sam embellished. Excelsis ~ a dark noel has been reissued for 2021 in a remastered CD and LP edition.

1: What made you want to come at Christmas from a different angle?

Back in 1995 when the Excelsis ~ a dark noel record came out, most Christmas records were Bing Crosby and Sinatra. Nothing inherently wrong with that but it was sort of tired. The more modern things seemed to be joke versions — “a Punk Rock Christmas” where someone screamed “jingle bells” once or twice in a mocking fashion. We thought there was a place for an ethereal, gothic and darkwave-styled reimagining of Christmas songs.

2: Is it a challenge putting together music that has something “new” to say about Christmas

Yes and no. Some people just took the idea and ran with it. Others had a harder time. That is what a concept compilation comes down to really — the artists. We had a good group.

3: To what extend did you want people to see Christmas from a different perspective?

It turns out they wanted it because the EExcelsis ~ a dark noel record came out in November of 1995 and within a year it was the best selling record on Projekt. For 2021 I’ve reissued the CD and also put it out on vinyl for the first time. The ’99 follow-up Excelsis ~ a winter’s song did quite well too.

4: How important is sincerity in a Christmas record? There are twinkling of Christmas spirit throughout the project – was that something you were keen to include?

Honestly? We didn’t mention sincerity to the artists at all. We tried to get across the notion that this wasn’t a “goofy greats” record making fun of the holiday but rather embracing it. Does a song from “The Grinch Who Stole Christmas” require sincerity? Or religious fervor? No! But you have to embrace the song and the season to do it well… and the same is true with the traditional songs.

5 Christmas can be challenging for many people – did you want to address that with the record?

Music can help people get through hard times in their lives and when most musicians stop to think about it they probably HOPE that someone takes something from their music — that it helps the listener in some way. Even if that is just making them happy for 3 minutes. That said there was no set motive to chase away Christmas depression (something I’d add that wasn’t talked about much 25 plus years ago). I certainly hope these records helped people who were feeling down over the holidays.

Mar 19

New DiN titles in the webstore + other labels.

Dave Bessell & Parallel Worlds: Phosphenes (CD) Dave Bessell: Reality Engine (CD) Ian Boddy: Axiom (CD) Ian Boddy: The Uncertainty Principle Reissue (CD) Nigel Mullaney: 31 Days (CD) Scanner: An Ascent (CD) Various Artists: Tone Science Module No​.​3 Cosines And Tangents (CD) Various Artists: Tone Science Module No​.​4 Form And Function (CD)

Feb 24

Free Projekt tote + sticker

This just in! Projekt Tote bags, free with your $50 order. Or buy the tote on it’s own for $5 (plus shipping). Available with orders here at Projekt and also our Bandcamp page. Tote information here and on bandcamp.

And while we’re at it, how about a free Projekt sticker with each order!

More about the tote: Holds about 15 LPs 6.0 oz., 100% cotton 20 1/2″ self-fabric handles 9 1/2″ handle drop Printed in America by Forest Passage Printing in Highland Heights, KY!

Feb 11

Sunwashed Evening Fire video from Sam Rosenthal & jarguna

Beautiful and enveloping new video from Projekt-founder Sam Rosenthal’s collaboration with Italy’s jarguna: Sunwashed evening fire. Filmed by jarguna in China, Nepal, Madagascar & Democratic Republic of the Congo. Processed edited by Sam. Watch at youTube The album is available on CD and a name-your-price download through Monday. Fan Krylda writes, “…sit down and relax to an album that gently soothes and caresses your soul. This album is a gentle and flowing melodic ride through a series of natural soundscapes that will calm you, reinvigorate you, and send you on a sonic journey that gently glistens and flows around you. This sonic soundscape is unrushed and will reveal its many treasures as you ride though its tracks.”

Nov 05

Steve Roach “HeartBreath” video and Tucson live performance

Steve Roach’s “HeartBreath” video at YouTube!

The second video for the new album, Tomorrow features incredible fractal animation by Brenda Molloy set to the track “HeartBreath.” Be sure to subscribe to Steve’s channel to keep up on all new video releases.

Live: All Souls Procession Ceremony

Sunday November 8, Steve Roach performs the opening and closing music for the 31st annual All Souls Procession Ceremony in Tucson, AZ. Stream it live from your living room. Streamed opening studio performance – 6pm MST / 8pm EST Live closing ceremony performance – 7:30pm MST / 9:30pm EST / 2:30 AM GMT Monday Steve is joined for both sets by electro acoustic artist Serena Gabriel.

The 31st annual All Souls Procession is a celebration and mourning of the lives of our lost loved ones and ancestors. It is presented at the Annex Performance Space in Downtown Tucson. Last year Steve performed the closing ceremony to approximately 100,000 people; while this year’s event is live in the outdoor venue, only the production staff will be in the audience. It will stream worldwide at https://allsoulsprocession.org/livestream/

Visuals for the closing ceremony are created by the artist NoctiVision, creator of the “Tomorrow” video and 2019’s All Souls Ceremony visuals.

Jul 24

Steve Roach streaming NPR interview for A Soul Ascends

Steve was interviewed on Tucson’s NPR station about the healing power of sound and his new album A Soul Ascends created as a final farewell to his mother. Alisa Ivanitskaya discusses the philosophy shaping Steve’s music. Stream the interview on Arizona Spotlight, from 15:10 – 26:15.

Purchase the A Soul Ascends CD at the Projekt webstore, CD & Download at Projekt Bandcamp, High Res downloads at Spotted Peccary & CD in Europe at the European Webstore.

A majestic, deeply moving sonic suspension drawn from the essence of Steve Roach’s visionary ambient/electronic music. A vast and intimate holding-the-space of heart-centered serenity and compassion, the album couples the body to the eternal flow of a vaporizing weightlessness — back to a divine nothingness, the Tabula Rasa where everything began.

“…slowly morphing and breathing as it goes forward in an unstoppable quest for inward tranquility.”

A review from Exposé by Peter Thelan:

In the four decades that Steve Roach has been making music, he has released close to 150 albums, both solo and in collaboration, maybe even more that I’m not aware of, and each new release has some vestigial connection to all that have gone before it, while also adding new elements that take on new directions – sometimes the changes are bold and sometimes incremental, and even other times reach back even further to elaborate on ideas that were committed to the lost and found, to be worked further, branched out and blossomed into new ideas. That may be the case with A Soul Ascends, which seems to draw on energies and emotions going back to some of his earliest works, calling forth several of the expansive and spacious works from the mid-1980s, with a new glowing warmth that establishes a certain mark of the present. A Soul Ascends, by its title seems to have a connection to some personal loss, but that’s not something that is enforced on the listener; in fact on its surface the music here is quite beautiful and angelic, slowly morphing and breathing as it goes forward in an unstoppable quest for inward tranquility. It consists of three extended movements; the first is the longest at just over thirty minutes, “The Radiant Return” moves patterns of successive colors, shades, shadows and brilliance slowly across a floating sonic canvas, where deep textures and soaring brilliances meet and overlap, like filters that interchangeably obscure and colorize the light of the sun, moon or stars. The second movement “In Present Space” is similar to the first, though at about half its length, continuing at roughly the same glacial pace, but occasionally fades to complete blackness. The third and final movement “Reflection In Ascension” is another long one, opening up some new textures via subtle sequences blending with the slow-morphing sounds introduced in the earlier movements. Like many of Roach’s works, one might get some extended mileage by putting this on in end-to-end repeat mode for an all day or all night marathon.

Jun 10

Alio Die’s Hic Sunt Leones label: 11 new CDs & 17 catalog releases!

We got a big box from Italy filled with new and catalog cD releases from Alio Die's Hic Sunt Leones label…

New releases now in stock: Aglaia: Astrolabio (CD) $16.00 Aglaia: Cosmic Museum(CD) $16.00 Aglaia: Thumbnails In The Setting Sun (CD) $16.00 Alio Die & Indalaska: Tempus Fugit (CD) $16.00 Alio Die & Parallel Worlds: The Utopian Blossom (CD) $16.00 Alio Die: Allegorical Traces I (CD) $16.00 Alio Die: Allegorical Traces II (CD) $16.00 Almamantra (Alberto Ezzu Ensemble): Almamantra (CD) $16.00 Mono No Aware: Implosion (CD) $16.00 Robert Davies: Incandescence (CD) $16.00 Stefano Scala: Metamorfosi (the music of Philip Glass) (CD) $16.00

Hic Sunt Leones catalog CDs back in stock: Aglaia: Ephemeral Blue (CD) $16.00 Aglaia: Floating Particles (CD) $16.00 Aglaia: Florealia Nocturna (CD) $16.00 Aglaia: Latitude (CD) $16.00 Aglaia: Leaves & Thunderstorms (CD) $16.00 Aglaia: Primeval Nebula (CD) $16.00 Aglaia: Water Inside The Light (CD) $16.00 Alio Die & Aglaia: Amitabha (CD) $16.00 Alio Die & Aglaia: Opera Magnetica (CD) $16.00 Alio Die & Lingua Fungi: Lento (CD) $16.00 Alio Die & Parallel Worlds: Elusive Metaphor (CD) $16.00 Alio Die: An Unfathomable Convergence (CD) $16.00 Alio Die: Imaginal Symmetry (CD) $16.00 Alio Die: Seamlessly Bliss (CD) $16.00 Alio Die: Standing In A Place (CD) $16.00 Alio Die: They Grow Layers Of Life Within (CD) $16.00 Alio Die: Time Zone Portal (CD) $16.00

Check out the full list of Hic Sunt Loenes titles we stock in the projekt webstore.