Archive for the ‘Blog from Sam’ Category

Aug 22

Jarguna: Prospettive Animiche (NEW and FREE!). Italian ethno-organic-ambient soundscapes

2 free downloads from jarguna, here

From Sam: You might wonder why I regularly give away downloads from this amazing Italian electro-ambient-drone artist. Why isn’t Projekt trying to get every possible penny from the albums we release. The answer is pretty simple: I want people to hear Jarguna’s work. I love the music he creates, I listen to it for hours and hours over here; it’s a perfect fit for fans of Projekt’s ambient side. Ok, but that doesn’t explain why it’s free. I find that any price point is an obstacle to people checking out new music from artists they aren’t familiar with. There’s so much available these days, it’s hard to get people to listen. Giving the music away allows Projekt and Jarguna to add something nice to your listening space where you can give the music time to work it’s magic on you.

That’s why I do it!

Jarguna is Italian ethno-organic-ambient sound-artist Marco Billi. Prospettive Animiche is intimate and minimalist with deep ambient characteristics. “I made this music,” Jarguna reflects, “by playing the instruments as if I were creating a mantra; what arose is a sound spiral for electronic meditation, drones for an emotional exploration, deep, low, slow, sometimes repetitive with refrains imbued with sacredness.”

Ok, there’s another reason I give albums away. Many of you are fans of the art of music, you understand it costs money (in time & energy) to create this work, and you’re generous and you want to support people who’ve dedicated their lives to creation. Thus, w hen getting a free download, many of you put in a donation. It doesn’t have to be a lot. A dollar. Five dollars? It adds up. That’s money Jarguna and Projekt split, so we can keep releasing great music.< Here's something you might not know. Prospettive Animiche is Jarguna’s 26th release! That’s a lot of wonderful music in 13 years.

CD-rs still available: Archetypes, Sogni di Sutra nei Venti, Trapped Vol 2, & Trapped Vol 1.

 

2019’s Prospettive Animiche and 2016’s Fusion of Soul. These digital-only releases are name-your-price for a week at Projekt’s Bandcamp store.

Aug 07

Free download: Mira’s debut (2000) #shoegaze #dream-pop #ethereal

mira: mira name-your-price download (and CD for $10) at Projekt’s Bandcamp

“A guitar-heavy shoegaze backdrop over a beautiful female voice, hovering like a red angel and instilling both fear and devotion.” – BIG TAKEOVER #44

Sam says, "Digging through the back catalog, I noticed Mira's debut wasn't on our Bandcamp page; so I fixed that. Back in 2000, this album introduced Projekt fans to an amazing new shoegaze band with Regina's striking vocals. At the time, fans were aching for more music to follow in the footsteps of our successful early-90s act Love Spirals Downwards; with Mira they got a full rock sound and aching, heartfelt vocals. Mira followed up their debut with two additional incredible albums. For today, give their debut a fresh listen, with a crisp new download for your collection. It's brilliant!

From POST-PUNK, 2018: Definitive Dreaminess: 100 Essential Dream Pop Releases: Hailing from the bowels of Florida, Mira found a perfect home on Projekt Records, a label well aligned with dream pop, shoegaze, and ethereal music. Their (2000) debut, a transitional record, perfectly dabbled in all three styles over the course of nine original tracks and a beautifully understated cover of a My Bloody Valentine classic that sleepily traded in the noise and focused on the song’s true essence. The song “Cayman,” while written about a cat, tugs at the heartstrings in a way that few songs can, building upon itself with sweeping layers of guitar and Regina Sosinska’s sweetly detached vocals. – FD

Mira drift on a wave of dreamy, engaging female vocals. Ripples of guitars swell against shores of post-punk structures, undulating in a surging, shoegazer undercurrent.

name-your-price download at Projekt's Bandcamp

Jul 04

Metcalf & Seelig: INTENTION name-your-price download & $8 CD Sale

July 9: name-your-price download is over. CD remains on sale for a few more days

Byron Metcalf & Mark Seelig: INTENTION Weekend sale: $8 CD and name-your-price download

at the Projekt Webstore and the Projekt Bandcamp page

Sam writes: It’s hard to believe it’s already five years since Projekt released this fabulous CD! I like reminding our listeners (new and regulars) about past releases worthy of attention, and one of the best ways of doing that is with a free download. Put it on your device and listen at your leisure. Intention is an especially potent release for journey work, meditation, studying, etc. Give it a go, and add it to your regular rotation.

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Intention is a totally acoustic, transcultural tour de force of multi-layered tribal-ambient rhythms, indigenous instruments, and mesmerizing soundscapes – expertly crafted to induce and support expanded states of consciousness.

Byron’s potent and spellbinding drumming and percussion merge with Mark’s haunting and beautiful bansuri flutes and Tuvan-style throat singing to create a bold, larger-than-life journey into infinite possibilities. Rob Thomas (Inlakesh) and Dashmesh Khalsa contribute aboriginal didgeridoo textures to further deepen and expand the sonic field.

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Tav Sparks (author and director of Grof Transpersonal Training) writes: “With Intention Byron Metcalf and Mark Seelig have created an irresistibly powerful, aesthetic synthesis of indigenous sources and trans-cultural trance with a mesmerizing urban shamanic pulse. This CD is proof that the rhythms and sounds of the ages can be translated with respect, grace, and skill to support a broad spectrum of transformational practices, including breathwork, dance, and any modern framework celebrating journeys into expanded states of awareness.”

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Peter Thelen of Expose writes: Trance music means different things to different listeners, and this latest collaboration between drummer and percussionist Byron Metcalf, and bansuri flute player Mark Seelig plus guests is a case in point where “Trance” doesn’t need to involve any electronics or amplified instrumentation at all. All but one of the five tracks feature didgeridoo, played either by Rob Thomas or Dashmesh Khalsa, with the final cut featuring guests on water pot udu and tabla. Each of the five long pieces – the shortest being just under ten minutes and the longest being well over an album side, evolve slowly and gently guide the listener into mysterious worlds of alternate consciousness, layering bansuri, digeridoo and overtone vocals (by Seelig) over a repetitive yet spellbinding bed of hand drums, rattles, shakers, and more.

The result takes a different path for each piece, but moves the listener into a tribal ambient world where sounds and feelings are folding and twisting together into something ritualistic and magical. While the overtone singing may sound like a synthesizer at times, the proceedings are a purely acoustic endeavor, merging powerful external visions with cosmic inner spaces into something of an explorative ceremony. The listener will find power and beauty among these primitive soundscapes, merging modern spirit with ancient traditions.

Byron Metcalf & Mark Seelig: INTENTION Weekend sale: $8 CD and name-your-price download at the Projekt Webstore and the Projekt Bandcamp page

Please reshare. Twitter: #ProjektRecords and @ProjektRecords

Jun 26

Two Steve Roach titles back in print, and preOrder the new Ian Boddy disc.

Steve Roach’s This Place To Be and Invisible are back-in-print at mid-line price. Deleted for a few years, these titles are shipping today from the Projekt webstore.

 

Steve Roach: This Place To Be (2019 Reissue CD) $12.00 (Now Shipping!) 

Evoking the stillpoint of now, this 2016 long-form piece was born in the spirit of Invisible, Bloodmoon Rising and other soul tone zones of pure immersion, deep atmospherics and textural healing. After a long run of concerts and the wide range of dynamic releases over the past few years, the return to home gave birth to this place to be.

Originally released in 2016 but out-of-print for years.

Steve Roach: Invisible (2019 Reissue CD) $12.00 (Now Shipping!)

“Invisible is a long-form zone world Steve created while hunkering down in the Timeroom during the last few cold and rain-filled days of 2014. Invisible is an ultra deep primordial dreamscape of shifting mercurial zones. Mist-shrouded amorphous phantasms appear and recede as distant substrata murmurs are felt as much as heard. Just a few days after its creation, it was offered as a gift on New Year’s Eve and many were able to travel deeply into the new year in a collective global soundcurrent experience.” – original description

Originally released in 2015 but out-of-print for years.

Steve Roach Live in Los Angeles, August 30

Ambient Church, Early-bird tickets on sale + advised. The pioneering American synthesist performs work spanning his 40-year career – including Dreamtime Return – in a 132-year-old 1400-capacity church in Pasadena. A long awaited 2-hour journey with a massive force in American space music.

VIEW MORE TITLES BY STEVE ROACH

Ian Boddy: Altair (Live At The Gatherings/Star’s End 2CD)

(Pre-Order, Expected Early July)    $17.00

DiN label boss Ian Boddy has been performing his own brand of ambient electronica since 1979. Over those 40 years he has built up a wealth of experience of what works in a live environment as well as being able to tailor his shows to the particular setting he finds himself in. As well as playing all over the UK and in Germany & The Netherlands he has also crossed the Atlantic several times to play shows in Philadelphia. The main reason for the latter destination is the wonderful community of listeners built up by Chuck van Zyl at The Gatherings series of concerts which provides a dedicated fan base for Boddy’s style of electronic music. Chuck is also the host of the excellent Star’s End Radio show on WXPN in Philadelphia and Boddy has often combined these concert trips with live radio shows for both Star’s End as well as Echoes Radio hosted by John Diliberto.

Thus 2018 ushered in a fresh adventure for Boddy with a new invitation to play at The Gatherings. His past performances have found their way on to releases such as Shrouded (his 2000 show) and React (DiN29) with Robert Rich. Several of his Star’s End live sets have also been released on DiNDDL as download only albums. However the trip in 2018 produced what is in Boddy’s opinion, his best pair of performances to date and so he has decided to release a double live album to showcase this trip.

The first disc documents his Gatherings show on the evening of 20th October in the beautiful St. Mary’s Church in Philadelphia whereas the second disc is his live radio show on Star’s End performed at 2am on the Sunday morning immediately after his Gatherings show.

See the full description here.

 

VIEW MORE TITLES FROM DiN RECORDS

You can read the fully formatted email list at iContact.

Jun 16

🎵 It’s just another Cyber Monday 🎶 50% off !!!

Hi! I say any Monday can be Cyber Monday if we want to have a sale! And we wanna have a sale! Take 50% off all downloads at the Projekt Bandcamp store.

PROJEKT’S CYBERMONDAY DIGITAL 50% OFF SALE

Digital-only 50% OFF sale at our Bandcamp store. Sale does not include merchandise (CDs+LPs+etc). Order refunded if you purchase merch. Use checkout coupon code "june2019". Sale ends Wednesday June 19, 2019, Noon EST.

Apr 29

Aurelio Voltaire $10 CD sale and name-your-price on BOO HOO

❤️ ☠️ ❤️ ☠️ ❤️ ☠️ ❤️ ☠️ ❤️ ☠️ ❤️ ☠️ ❤️ ☠️ ❤️ ☠️ ❤️ This month, Projekt reprinted 4 of Aurelio Voltaire’s releases; 5 of his 6 albums are now in earth-saving non-jewel box packaging. To celebrate, we’ve put his entire Projekt catalog on sale for $10; and Boo Hoo is a free download at Bandcamp to boot! Purchase here at the Projekt Webstore, or from our Bandcamp page.

Sale runs for one week, through May 6.

Apr 24

Red Bull Music Academy Daily March 2017

Artist interview > 2017

Unfortunately, the Red Bull Music Academy website is shutting down. We didn’t want to lose Ned Raggett’s in depth March 10, 2017 Steve Roach interview. We’re archiving it here on the Projekt site for posterity….

Synth Musician Steve Roach on Tapping into Currents of Sound

A master of meditative soundscapes shares his creative philosophies

Following his enthusiastic interest in experimental electronic and progressive music as a young man in California in the 1970s, Steve Roach now stands as one of the core figures in the open-ended field. His daunting, astonishingly rich catalog of albums, covering solo work as well as a multitude of collaborations, ranges from cold, grim sequencer voyages through blackest space to warm, bright evocations of vast landscapes, often inspired by the Arizona desert where he and his family have made their home for decades.

While his landmark 1984 release Structures from Silence has received due praise in recent years, any number of other releases deserve recognition. His one-off collaboration with guitarist Roger King, 1998’s Dust to Dust, captures an eerily beautiful sensibility of the high desert, while the multi-volume Immersion series from the mid-2000s explores a series of detailed and sublime compositions measuring hours in length. A contrast can be found in 2012’s Back To Life, which is just as immersive but likewise feels free and open, a movement through space as much as time.

In February 2017, Roach released his latest effort, The Passing, an hour-long composition that was completed and made public on his 62nd birthday. In this career-spanning interview, Roach discusses his creative background and writing process, questions of time and language that persist in his work and advice for younger artists in the field.

photo: Adam Fleishman

If we could start with the creative impulse – what, where and when was your first sense of a particular creative or artistic accomplishment that you did in any field?

Before music I was drawn towards using my hands and painting, some sculpting and working with material. The compulsion to make something from nothing, I would say when I was a young teenager, became really at the forefront for me in terms of what I was drawn towards. I was starting to paint on my own and work with that kind of spontaneous expression with color and shape and form, in a nontraditional, completely freeform environment. I wasn’t taking classes or being instructed by anyone, I was just following these inner impulses to create something expressive.

At that time, I would say it was quite connected to a lot of time I was spending in the desert areas of Southern California, out beyond San Diego and the Anza-Borrego desert. There was something there that really opened up doors for me of this kind of space and this kind of creative process that seemed almost like a birthright, like something I was discovering through that process of doing it. Certainly early music from the early days inspired me – the early progressive music, the early music from the Berlin school, Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream and early electronic music, Pink Floyd of course. The longer tracks, and tracks that had no vocals and were more what you would think of as sound paintings at that time, were already lighting me up in those ways.

(That was) setting the stage for when I then would first find an affordable portable synthesizer in the late ’70s. That would have been the ARP 2600, the first full-blown synthesizer that I saw in a local store, and combined with hearing the music from Europe, that whole progression became so powerful, so appealing and almost compulsive that I had to have it – to start shifting that sense of painting and shaping and working from abstract forms into forms that seemed more architectural, but formed and shaped in a way that I was almost tasting and seeing in visual form.

I had a lot of the aspects of the arts from a painting and sculpting state of mind, but sound – once I got my hands on those instruments, it was like I already knew the process. I had this sense of, “I know how to do this.” So I continued through my own process of teaching myself how to work with it, just a classic woodshedding story where you lock yourself in your little space for as many hours of the day or night that you could.

You’ve spoken in other interviews in some detail about tactile creation via your chosen instruments. Could you say a little more about the sense of physical approach and how you contrast it with what might be less fulfilling approaches?

It’s interesting, because I was just looking at some soft synth instruments that I was looking to explore, and I’m basically 99.9 percent a hardware instrument composer of electronic music. They have knobs and sliders and there’s a feel to them, they have a whole particular unique combination of aspects to them that you can identify with the same way a guitarist might identify with a Telecaster or a Stratocaster or whatever different guitar you’re drawn to.

But beyond all that would be the sound itself, the quality that one synthesizer at that time would make over another. The subtlety and the nuance that comes from the analog synthesizer and the analog experience is something that is the throughline through all of my work that exists all the way up to this morning, when I woke up and was carving sounds out on another hardware synth that I’m exploring and working with right now.

That connection to an instrument, where there’s zero latency and you’re not interfacing with what seems like a facsimile of a controller into a computer or something like that – they’re so sophisticated now, I know, and there are so many options there that are off the chart, and there’s a whole universe of comparisons that can be made now. But I tried to do that, and I just keep coming back – the experience of creating just doesn’t have that same kind of engagement and that same kind of flow. It’s just fun. It’s a real experience of just connecting with a synth that’s designed really well, and it has an ergonomic flow, and there’s no screen, and you’re not getting locked into the visual. You can get really lost in visual with the screen tracking everything. Then I find that you start to stop listening or hearing in the same way when you take away that element and you just are working through the sound field, meditating, staring, focusing intently on the space between the speakers with no screen. That’s a powerful place.

Just a slight, tiny little adjustment of a few different knobs can make a universe of emotionally engaged difference and perception.

I do use the computer for recording and for arranging and for building my pieces; it’s invaluable. I couldn’t imagine not having a workstation for the nonlinear approach to building these worlds that I do. But in that way, I guess the parallel would be if you’re a filmmaker, then you’re out shooting scenes of things that are happening and you’re capturing performances between actors, you’re capturing light shifting in the afternoon with some occurrence that’s happening there, and you’re completely tuned into that as the experience that you’re capturing.

That’s how I record so much of my music, is more in that context where you’re capturing a living, breathing experience that’s happening right between your very ears and in front of your eyes, and you’re shaping it and carving upon it at the most subtle level that the analog stuff brings, where just a slight, tiny little adjustment of a few different knobs can make a universe of emotionally engaged difference and perception.

So while that’s happening, I’m recording all of this constantly in the studio. A lot of times it’s being recorded as a stereo file. There’ll be maybe 30, 40 tracks up on that board. I have a large analog mixing console to go along with all the different instruments. Then the board itself becomes a palette where the artist mixes his paint. So between the paint-mixing, the levels, the synth, the dialing in and tuning of all these interrelationships between the instruments while they’re running live, then the processing, the reverb, the hands-on aspect of the board itself – I mean, the board is one massive instrument. That’s really another big piece in my music.

For the way I have evolved as an electronic music artist and what remains important to me… To start at the top, the list would be just the emotional impact of the sound, and then right there, almost at the same level, is how you’re extracting it, how you’re tuning into it with your body. If your body’s an instrument, which I feel it is for me – it’s one of the first instruments – then the tools, the surgical tools of sonic surgery, just need to be something that I have this relationship that I’ve also built and developed over almost 40 years. So all of those are important things to stay connected to and to not give up.

How does the conception of time figure into the limitations of recording technology in this sense? You’ve seen everything from the specific limits in terms of how much music can be presented from vinyl to cassettes to CDs to now the theoretically infinite space online presentation can give you. Is there a constant struggle between where and how to draw the lines, or how to act as an editor of your own work?

The dynamic of the listening process, the idea that something is going on too long or not long enough – it’s still completely as vital as ever. Now we have the ability to have basically an eternal space where I can just broadcast it out. Let’s say I’ve set up a station on one of my sites, and I can have music and dronescapes and all that sort of things just going on from here ’til the end of electricity. That’s a world that I really love to live in, this whole immersion world, and the Immersion series I started years ago really grew out of wanting to not leave the sound current. I always connect to this sense that there’s sound running in this current all the time, all around me, and I’m tapping into it, reaching and grabbing a section of it for a while and shaping it and presenting it out into a form that captures a certain limited sense of time.

Somehow the CD became a 74 minute medium, and now through different ways of presenting files, compressed or whatnot, you can have things extend for a long time or, like I say, a live broadcast of something running off into infinity. But the idea of composition and the way I work with time, and the way I work with sonic motifs – when I say “motifs” I’m moving beyond what would be a melody or a harmonic chord structure, but it’s something that’s so prevalent in electronic music, these episodes of sound that become signatures, and they can be completely abstract or completely unique to themselves. But there’s still an aesthetic to them that you can connect to and listen to and engage with. At a certain point you have to know when it’s overstayed its welcome, for example, or when something has made the statement and it needs to shift into the next place, or that sometimes something cannot sustain or breathe long enough to let you settle into the space and let your body engage with it.

There’s a big piece of the music that emerges from body awareness, and there’s the conscious mind awareness, and then there’s the subtle energy awareness of something that can play forever. I would learn early on I would have certain pieces that would be too short, essentially, and I would hear from listeners that it was too short. “I wanted to hear it for another 45 minutes.” [laughs] And I would agree with that in some cases.

But especially in the days when I was moving away from the influences of the European electronic music, I was consciously interested in shortening pieces and making a point and then moving to the next place, and evolving that to where the statement is made within a seven or eight minute space, which would be a shorter time frame when you grew up listening to 30 minute sides of an album.

Eventually I would return to the longer forms, and that’s probably what my preference is now, to have these movements happen within these longer forms to that sense of altering of time, where you’re slowing time down, where you take markers of time out of that space, where you’re in this continuous amniotic fluid and you’re almost floating in a womb-like state that’s not just ‘tape some keys down on a keyboard and then make lunch and come back.’

The sustained drone zone music, if you’re fully engaged with it, there’s a whole thing happening down at a molecular level with that stuff, way down inside, where movement and interaction and layers all work together in the way that, when you see large-scale abstract paintings that have a vibration and a frequency, there’s this compelling, magnetic quality to them that pulls you in and lets you experience yourself outside of normal perception and enhances your perception and expands your boundaries of your perception at the same time.

The new piece I just released called The Passing came together pretty quickly. I like to release a piece or do a concert or do something to mark that moment in time when I happen to have another birthday, and so this one, through Bandcamp, finishes up the thought with your sense of when something goes on too long, or “what’s the timing on it” or “too short.” It’s this theme I created in the mid-’90s for a compilation, and at that time it just felt so truncated and unrealized. It was really like a sketch that normally I wouldn’t have let out into the world. It had so much energy to it and had this emotional resonance to it that felt like it needed to just completely be allowed to breathe and develop. So it took a lot of years later, but that inspired me a few weeks ago just in terms of the emotion in the piece.

Album and song titles, by default, provide a linguistic context to your work that otherwise has no such element, in terms of there not being any lyrics. Do you struggle with the “right” titles for albums or songs, or is it more casual or random or easy than that?

I wish it was casual, random and easy. It is that, sometimes. But it’s still having a title that has a very significant and profound connection to the piece. Let’s say I’m working on a piece that’s come through just from the direct experience of all these different influences that are bringing me into the studio and creating the desire to go in this direction or that direction. It can be spontaneous, it can be completely unconnected to what I thought I was going in to do, but ultimately the titles are so important in the music in terms of the reflection that they can shine upon your perception when you hear the title and then you see the cover and then you hear the music, and then those things can work together for me.

It’s like a door that has three locks on it, and all three of those locks can have even more impact if those words resonate with the feeling in the music and the cover image is also connected congruently to that. So you think of Structures from Silence, or (1988’s) Dreamtime Return, for example, at a certain point the words will start emerging, shaping and carving the album into shape.

If nothing’s come through by the time that I’m at the mastering stage, then I just put full focus on listening, sometimes all afternoon into the evening, and I just keep going deeper and deeper into the place that the music’s taking me without any engagement of technical aspects like EQ or mastering. I’m just listening to it in a way that’s active and stimulating the mythic imagination, let’s say, and letting the music take me to the places that I’m hoping that it takes the listeners to.

Sometimes it takes quite a while to birth the title after the music is complete. I’ll have that discussion with Sam (Rosenthal), who runs Projekt (Records), and we’ve got everything ready – we might even have the album cover ready to go, and there’s no titles on anything. It’s sitting there waiting for that stage. I can take it that far into the birthing process of finding that. But I’ll always have working titles, or usually have working titles or words that convey the feeling. If I’m talking to visual artists, then I’ll use those kinds of descriptions to help draw material through visually. Or else I’ll take photos myself, or do whatever it takes. Really, it’s a complete engagement, and it’s way more complex than I think a lot of people would be aware of from the outside, where they just think, “Well, he’s having fun cranking out some music, and now he’s got this album out.”

Then, the details that go in behind the scenes with the mastering and the subtlety that goes on there – I’m really having some great success working with Howard Givens, who owns the Spotted Peccary label with partners. His whole setup is ultra high-end, analog front-end mastering tools. It’s making a big difference for me. I can hear it and I can see it in the response, also. So between Howard and Sam with that end of the production, we’ve got a great team, and I’m just really grateful to be working with those guys at this point.

If a younger artist in any field approaches you and asks for advice or even a simple suggestion about what to keep in mind for the future, what would be your response?

I would probably first ask them questions about their creative process to get a sense of what it is that they’re drawn to, what they’re aiming to express. Then I would have to ask them if they’re coming to me and they’re interested in what I’m doing, regardless of their age or my age, or just the art form itself. I would share the techniques that we’ve talked about in this interview thus far, and I would talk about their connection to yourself as a person before you approach any instrument or any tool. It’s just getting your intention and your clarity and getting a wide view of what it is you’re wanting to express.

Even if you don’t quite understand it enough to articulate it with words, finding that emotional landscape to draw from, and then trying to stay connected to what really feels right for you, for the artist, rather than being seduced by all the newest, most recent innovations in technology or the flavor-of-the-month stuff. I know it’s quite affordable, and you can build a whole studio’s worth of material inside of a MacBook Pro, but it doesn’t take much to bring in a few hardware pieces that just give you that hands-on subtlety. Really listen and draw from the things that inspire you. It could be musically or non-musically, but find the pulse inside of that.

I just also remind younger listeners when they respond to some of my classic titles like Structures or Dreamtime that those were all created on what would be considered very archaic, very simple equipment at that time. There’s this sense that I wanted to defy the technology all the way along. It really didn’t matter what I was using; I would use things that people would come back around and say, “You used that? To create that? Recorded that on a four-track or a cassette player?” I have a lot of pieces that were recorded on a Nakamichi cassette player, and captured at that level. That’s basically the multifaceted question towards a younger composer of today.

Apr 18

Projekt Coffee Mug 2019 edition

I’ve printed a new Projekt mug, limited to 36 per color. I really love the design because it’s just a bit shorter than a standard coffee mug, so it easily slips under my espresso machine’s portafilter. Matte black finish on the outside with glossy logo, and glossy color on the inside. Available in Red, Sky Blue, & (Stealth) Royal Blue. Set of 2 with 1 bonus for $20, or single mug (your choice of color) for $12.

 Sorry about this note to export customers… while I *could* ship these outside of the USA you’ll see that postage is just too expensive to be worth your while. 

Feb 21

The Gesture of History | Sam with Nick Shadow & Steve Roach

There’s 2 weeks to go on my crowdfunding campaign for The Gesture of History, an ambient collaboration I created with violist Nick Shadow and synthesist Steve Roach. You can pledge to make this CD/LP exist. Backing there is sort of like preOrdering, it’s a lot like being a patron of the art. Your contribution goes to manufacture the LP (black or gold), the CD, a royalty for Steve and Shadow, mastering costs, shipping supplies, the fees, etc.

Yesterday I posted an update with info on two new premiums, and also a short conversation in which Steve asks me a few questions about running a campaign.

Listen to a track from the album at Bandcamp. A backer, Scott, wrote on the page, “A melodic immersion into an abstract emotional soundscape.”

We’re 52% of the way to the goal. Please contribute if you can, to help push us over the top. Thanks.

Sam

This is the $125 Fleece Blanket Premium | I ordered one of the blankets, to see how the image prints large. Looks nice. And boy oh boy, are they large! This photo is my almost-6-foot son holding one up. (Note: Sriracha sauce!)

Feb 06

Projekt’s Steve Roach receives his second consecutive Grammy™ nomination

December 16 2018:

Tucson-based electronic/ambient pioneer Steve Roach received his second Grammy nomination with 2018’s Molecules of Motion album. Chosen in the Best New Age Album category, it follows last year’s nominated Spiral Revelation.

For Molecules, Roach calls upon an expansive 35-year legacy at the forefront of electronic music creation on a masterful album with roots in the Berlin School and a foot in the transcendent unknown of the future flowing into the present moment. Shimmering, pulsing, moving, emotional and engaging, the album is a sonic marvel: a tapestry of sequencer-spun patterns floating upon an atmosphere of lush emotive textures alive with a vibrant, life-affirming glow.

Always reaching towards what’s next on the horizon, Roach refuses to be tied down in any one stylistic direction. His worldwide audience continues to grow, and his innovations continue to inspire new and long-time listeners. Listening to a Steve Roach album, you hear the momentum of a lifetime dedicated to the soundcurrent, an artist operating at the pinnacle of his artform, with dedication, passion and an unbroken focus on creating a personal vision of electronic music.

Roach’s hypnotic meditations upon elegant motion and electro-sensual space makes Molecules of Motion unlike anything nominated for a Grammy this year. It’s just one facet of the multi-faceted soundworlds that are paramount to his work.

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Contact sr.projekt@gmail for a download code; or stream at: https://projektrecords.bandcamp.com/album/molecules-of-motion If tweeting, please @ProjektRecords Steve is available for phone or in-person interviews Image download: https://www.projekt.com/store/assets/artistphoto.html

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Visit the Steve Roach Photo Gallery. 2018 Steve Roach bio: welcome to the vortex. Steve talks about his career and second consecutive Grammy Nomination in Tucson Weekly!

Congrats to Steve Roach!

Projekt Records’ Steve Roach was nominated for a GRAMMY for the 2nd year in a row! His 2018 Molecules of Motion has been nominated for Best New Age Album of the year (the Grammys don’t have an “electronic music” category, so a wide variety of styles are placed within New Age). Around this time last year, we were telling you about Steve’s 2017 Spiral Revelation getting nominated for the Grammy! It’s a wonderful second opportunity to claim the prize. The award ceremony is in February.

Amazing news!

Sprial Revelations | Projekt webstore | Projekt Bandcamp

Molecules of Motion | Projekt webstore | Projekt Bandcamp

Check out Steve’s new release, in stores January 4 2019: Mercurius | Projekt webstore | Projekt Bandcamp

There’s a Steve Roach article in Psychology Today: 2019 Grammy Nominee Is A Synesthete.

Steve talks about his career and second consecutive Grammy Nomination in Tucson Weekly!

February 7 2019 addition from Projekt’s Sam Rosenthal:

Steve Roach is nominated for his second consecutive Grammy Award, for the album Molecules of Motion; it’s in the Best New Age Album category. Steve travels to Los Angeles for Sunday’s Premiere Ceremony. Over the weekend he will post updates on his Facebook page. I’m really quite curious what it’s like when an independent artist goes to the Grammys!

I talk with Steve all the time, discussing his albums that we have in production for Projekt and Timeroom, albums that he’s started working on, the music business, creativity, and so much more. Getting nominated for a Grammy was never on the list of things we talked about… until last year’s nomination for Spiral Revelation. Well, that was interesting, I thought. Then nominated for the second year in a row? As Steve says, lightning struck twice.

Steve has dedicated so many years to his art, I totally think he should have a Grammy! And so do his listeners! I regularly get emails and read facebook post from people who were monumentally touched and affected by Steve’s music. I know there’s love out there from all of you. But from the music industry? I know the biz is very focused on big sales, and flashy promotion…. Though Steve did get to the final-5 twice, so that tells me the voters are listening and know Steve’s work. Winning an actual Grammy award!? As I said, it’s was never on our radar. Sunday afternoon! Let’s see what happens!

There are over 80 categories in the Grammys; most awards are not televised in the primetime event. Instead they can be watched in the streaming afternoon ceremony.

Their website says: Kick off Grammy Sunday, Feb. 10, by kicking back and streaming the Grammy Awards Premiere Ceremony on GRAMMY.com. Starting at 3:30 p.m. ET / 2:30 p.m. CT / 12:30 Pacific, host Shaggy will lead us through the festivities, with all-star presenters such as Lzzy Hale and Questlove and can’t-miss performances by Ángela Aguilar, Natalia Lafourcade, Sofi Tukker and more.

Steam on-line, or check out Steve’s Facebook page with updates from the weekend.

– Sam

Grammy Reflections February 2019, from Steve Roach:

After last year’s surprise nomination for Spiral Revelation — and with this year’s nomination for Molecules of Motion — a lightning bolt hit the tree again. Last weekend’s award ceremony in Los Angeles presented a nearby adventure to visit what felt like another planet.

It’s a planet I know well, having lived on the front lines in LA, the city of ambition, for 10 formative years from 1979-1989. Throughout the Grammy weekend the flood of memories was constant. From my first drive up from San Diego in 1979 in an old yellow VW Bug with the seats removed and filled to capacity with synths, to the endless concerts over that decade throughout SoCal, to jobs at record stores on Sunset Blvd and Wilshire, to a stint as a microbiology lab tech — these were just a few of the threads woven together to support my dream of creating this music day and night. Regular trips to the Joshua Tree Monument to feed my desert soul were vital and helped birth Structures From Silence, Western Spaces and Dreamtime Return. These were just some of the things coming up while sitting in the Microsoft theater for the afternoon Grammy award ceremony, surreal and resonate on many levels.

The idea of the Grammys connected to my music has never been on my radar. It all started with confidant, long time friend, and mastering-guru Howard Givens, a voting member of the Recording Academy; in 2017 he quietly submitted Spiral Revelation for consideration. Sam Rosenthal at Projekt and I knew nothing about this until the morning in late 2017 when the emails about earning the nomination started pouring in. With the January 2018 awards in NYC — and my concerts gearing up around that time — the priorities were clear about going to NYC: not possible. Sam became a voting member last year and submitted Molecules Of Motion as a “why not try this year and see?” and that was that, I was nominated for the second consecutive year.

While the Grammys mean something or nothing to different people, the fact that these albums were voted into the top 5 nomination list twice — with absolutely no campaign on our part — speaks of a real beating heart inside the Recording Academy / Grammy organization. I had no expectations of the outcome this year. Just grateful for the wider recognition and awareness the nomination brings to my music and life’s work.

The weekend was really about feeling the momentum of living life on the creative edge for the last 45 years. There is no winning or losing in this realm. It’s about being fully present, embracing the moment and tuning into what’s next as it’s happening with grace and courage. I have been so blessed to share every molecule of all this with Linda Kohanov since 1989.

Gratitude abounding to the community of soundcurrent friends around the world who have been with me on this journey of one which includes so many.

All my best! Steve February 16, 2019 (64 years on this planet today!)