Archive for the ‘Artists’ Category

Apr 24

Red Bull Music Academy Daily March 2017

Artist interview > 2017

Unfortunately, the Red Bull Music Academy website is shutting down. We didn’t want to lose Ned Raggett’s in depth March 10, 2017 Steve Roach interview. We’re archiving it here on the Projekt site for posterity….

Synth Musician Steve Roach on Tapping into Currents of Sound

A master of meditative soundscapes shares his creative philosophies

Following his enthusiastic interest in experimental electronic and progressive music as a young man in California in the 1970s, Steve Roach now stands as one of the core figures in the open-ended field. His daunting, astonishingly rich catalog of albums, covering solo work as well as a multitude of collaborations, ranges from cold, grim sequencer voyages through blackest space to warm, bright evocations of vast landscapes, often inspired by the Arizona desert where he and his family have made their home for decades.

While his landmark 1984 release Structures from Silence has received due praise in recent years, any number of other releases deserve recognition. His one-off collaboration with guitarist Roger King, 1998’s Dust to Dust, captures an eerily beautiful sensibility of the high desert, while the multi-volume Immersion series from the mid-2000s explores a series of detailed and sublime compositions measuring hours in length. A contrast can be found in 2012’s Back To Life, which is just as immersive but likewise feels free and open, a movement through space as much as time.

In February 2017, Roach released his latest effort, The Passing, an hour-long composition that was completed and made public on his 62nd birthday. In this career-spanning interview, Roach discusses his creative background and writing process, questions of time and language that persist in his work and advice for younger artists in the field.

photo: Adam Fleishman

If we could start with the creative impulse – what, where and when was your first sense of a particular creative or artistic accomplishment that you did in any field?

Before music I was drawn towards using my hands and painting, some sculpting and working with material. The compulsion to make something from nothing, I would say when I was a young teenager, became really at the forefront for me in terms of what I was drawn towards. I was starting to paint on my own and work with that kind of spontaneous expression with color and shape and form, in a nontraditional, completely freeform environment. I wasn’t taking classes or being instructed by anyone, I was just following these inner impulses to create something expressive.

At that time, I would say it was quite connected to a lot of time I was spending in the desert areas of Southern California, out beyond San Diego and the Anza-Borrego desert. There was something there that really opened up doors for me of this kind of space and this kind of creative process that seemed almost like a birthright, like something I was discovering through that process of doing it. Certainly early music from the early days inspired me – the early progressive music, the early music from the Berlin school, Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream and early electronic music, Pink Floyd of course. The longer tracks, and tracks that had no vocals and were more what you would think of as sound paintings at that time, were already lighting me up in those ways.

(That was) setting the stage for when I then would first find an affordable portable synthesizer in the late ’70s. That would have been the ARP 2600, the first full-blown synthesizer that I saw in a local store, and combined with hearing the music from Europe, that whole progression became so powerful, so appealing and almost compulsive that I had to have it – to start shifting that sense of painting and shaping and working from abstract forms into forms that seemed more architectural, but formed and shaped in a way that I was almost tasting and seeing in visual form.

I had a lot of the aspects of the arts from a painting and sculpting state of mind, but sound – once I got my hands on those instruments, it was like I already knew the process. I had this sense of, “I know how to do this.” So I continued through my own process of teaching myself how to work with it, just a classic woodshedding story where you lock yourself in your little space for as many hours of the day or night that you could.

You’ve spoken in other interviews in some detail about tactile creation via your chosen instruments. Could you say a little more about the sense of physical approach and how you contrast it with what might be less fulfilling approaches?

It’s interesting, because I was just looking at some soft synth instruments that I was looking to explore, and I’m basically 99.9 percent a hardware instrument composer of electronic music. They have knobs and sliders and there’s a feel to them, they have a whole particular unique combination of aspects to them that you can identify with the same way a guitarist might identify with a Telecaster or a Stratocaster or whatever different guitar you’re drawn to.

But beyond all that would be the sound itself, the quality that one synthesizer at that time would make over another. The subtlety and the nuance that comes from the analog synthesizer and the analog experience is something that is the throughline through all of my work that exists all the way up to this morning, when I woke up and was carving sounds out on another hardware synth that I’m exploring and working with right now.

That connection to an instrument, where there’s zero latency and you’re not interfacing with what seems like a facsimile of a controller into a computer or something like that – they’re so sophisticated now, I know, and there are so many options there that are off the chart, and there’s a whole universe of comparisons that can be made now. But I tried to do that, and I just keep coming back – the experience of creating just doesn’t have that same kind of engagement and that same kind of flow. It’s just fun. It’s a real experience of just connecting with a synth that’s designed really well, and it has an ergonomic flow, and there’s no screen, and you’re not getting locked into the visual. You can get really lost in visual with the screen tracking everything. Then I find that you start to stop listening or hearing in the same way when you take away that element and you just are working through the sound field, meditating, staring, focusing intently on the space between the speakers with no screen. That’s a powerful place.

Just a slight, tiny little adjustment of a few different knobs can make a universe of emotionally engaged difference and perception.

I do use the computer for recording and for arranging and for building my pieces; it’s invaluable. I couldn’t imagine not having a workstation for the nonlinear approach to building these worlds that I do. But in that way, I guess the parallel would be if you’re a filmmaker, then you’re out shooting scenes of things that are happening and you’re capturing performances between actors, you’re capturing light shifting in the afternoon with some occurrence that’s happening there, and you’re completely tuned into that as the experience that you’re capturing.

That’s how I record so much of my music, is more in that context where you’re capturing a living, breathing experience that’s happening right between your very ears and in front of your eyes, and you’re shaping it and carving upon it at the most subtle level that the analog stuff brings, where just a slight, tiny little adjustment of a few different knobs can make a universe of emotionally engaged difference and perception.

So while that’s happening, I’m recording all of this constantly in the studio. A lot of times it’s being recorded as a stereo file. There’ll be maybe 30, 40 tracks up on that board. I have a large analog mixing console to go along with all the different instruments. Then the board itself becomes a palette where the artist mixes his paint. So between the paint-mixing, the levels, the synth, the dialing in and tuning of all these interrelationships between the instruments while they’re running live, then the processing, the reverb, the hands-on aspect of the board itself – I mean, the board is one massive instrument. That’s really another big piece in my music.

For the way I have evolved as an electronic music artist and what remains important to me… To start at the top, the list would be just the emotional impact of the sound, and then right there, almost at the same level, is how you’re extracting it, how you’re tuning into it with your body. If your body’s an instrument, which I feel it is for me – it’s one of the first instruments – then the tools, the surgical tools of sonic surgery, just need to be something that I have this relationship that I’ve also built and developed over almost 40 years. So all of those are important things to stay connected to and to not give up.

How does the conception of time figure into the limitations of recording technology in this sense? You’ve seen everything from the specific limits in terms of how much music can be presented from vinyl to cassettes to CDs to now the theoretically infinite space online presentation can give you. Is there a constant struggle between where and how to draw the lines, or how to act as an editor of your own work?

The dynamic of the listening process, the idea that something is going on too long or not long enough – it’s still completely as vital as ever. Now we have the ability to have basically an eternal space where I can just broadcast it out. Let’s say I’ve set up a station on one of my sites, and I can have music and dronescapes and all that sort of things just going on from here ’til the end of electricity. That’s a world that I really love to live in, this whole immersion world, and the Immersion series I started years ago really grew out of wanting to not leave the sound current. I always connect to this sense that there’s sound running in this current all the time, all around me, and I’m tapping into it, reaching and grabbing a section of it for a while and shaping it and presenting it out into a form that captures a certain limited sense of time.

Somehow the CD became a 74 minute medium, and now through different ways of presenting files, compressed or whatnot, you can have things extend for a long time or, like I say, a live broadcast of something running off into infinity. But the idea of composition and the way I work with time, and the way I work with sonic motifs – when I say “motifs” I’m moving beyond what would be a melody or a harmonic chord structure, but it’s something that’s so prevalent in electronic music, these episodes of sound that become signatures, and they can be completely abstract or completely unique to themselves. But there’s still an aesthetic to them that you can connect to and listen to and engage with. At a certain point you have to know when it’s overstayed its welcome, for example, or when something has made the statement and it needs to shift into the next place, or that sometimes something cannot sustain or breathe long enough to let you settle into the space and let your body engage with it.

There’s a big piece of the music that emerges from body awareness, and there’s the conscious mind awareness, and then there’s the subtle energy awareness of something that can play forever. I would learn early on I would have certain pieces that would be too short, essentially, and I would hear from listeners that it was too short. “I wanted to hear it for another 45 minutes.” [laughs] And I would agree with that in some cases.

But especially in the days when I was moving away from the influences of the European electronic music, I was consciously interested in shortening pieces and making a point and then moving to the next place, and evolving that to where the statement is made within a seven or eight minute space, which would be a shorter time frame when you grew up listening to 30 minute sides of an album.

Eventually I would return to the longer forms, and that’s probably what my preference is now, to have these movements happen within these longer forms to that sense of altering of time, where you’re slowing time down, where you take markers of time out of that space, where you’re in this continuous amniotic fluid and you’re almost floating in a womb-like state that’s not just ‘tape some keys down on a keyboard and then make lunch and come back.’

The sustained drone zone music, if you’re fully engaged with it, there’s a whole thing happening down at a molecular level with that stuff, way down inside, where movement and interaction and layers all work together in the way that, when you see large-scale abstract paintings that have a vibration and a frequency, there’s this compelling, magnetic quality to them that pulls you in and lets you experience yourself outside of normal perception and enhances your perception and expands your boundaries of your perception at the same time.

The new piece I just released called The Passing came together pretty quickly. I like to release a piece or do a concert or do something to mark that moment in time when I happen to have another birthday, and so this one, through Bandcamp, finishes up the thought with your sense of when something goes on too long, or “what’s the timing on it” or “too short.” It’s this theme I created in the mid-’90s for a compilation, and at that time it just felt so truncated and unrealized. It was really like a sketch that normally I wouldn’t have let out into the world. It had so much energy to it and had this emotional resonance to it that felt like it needed to just completely be allowed to breathe and develop. So it took a lot of years later, but that inspired me a few weeks ago just in terms of the emotion in the piece.

Album and song titles, by default, provide a linguistic context to your work that otherwise has no such element, in terms of there not being any lyrics. Do you struggle with the “right” titles for albums or songs, or is it more casual or random or easy than that?

I wish it was casual, random and easy. It is that, sometimes. But it’s still having a title that has a very significant and profound connection to the piece. Let’s say I’m working on a piece that’s come through just from the direct experience of all these different influences that are bringing me into the studio and creating the desire to go in this direction or that direction. It can be spontaneous, it can be completely unconnected to what I thought I was going in to do, but ultimately the titles are so important in the music in terms of the reflection that they can shine upon your perception when you hear the title and then you see the cover and then you hear the music, and then those things can work together for me.

It’s like a door that has three locks on it, and all three of those locks can have even more impact if those words resonate with the feeling in the music and the cover image is also connected congruently to that. So you think of Structures from Silence, or (1988’s) Dreamtime Return, for example, at a certain point the words will start emerging, shaping and carving the album into shape.

If nothing’s come through by the time that I’m at the mastering stage, then I just put full focus on listening, sometimes all afternoon into the evening, and I just keep going deeper and deeper into the place that the music’s taking me without any engagement of technical aspects like EQ or mastering. I’m just listening to it in a way that’s active and stimulating the mythic imagination, let’s say, and letting the music take me to the places that I’m hoping that it takes the listeners to.

Sometimes it takes quite a while to birth the title after the music is complete. I’ll have that discussion with Sam (Rosenthal), who runs Projekt (Records), and we’ve got everything ready – we might even have the album cover ready to go, and there’s no titles on anything. It’s sitting there waiting for that stage. I can take it that far into the birthing process of finding that. But I’ll always have working titles, or usually have working titles or words that convey the feeling. If I’m talking to visual artists, then I’ll use those kinds of descriptions to help draw material through visually. Or else I’ll take photos myself, or do whatever it takes. Really, it’s a complete engagement, and it’s way more complex than I think a lot of people would be aware of from the outside, where they just think, “Well, he’s having fun cranking out some music, and now he’s got this album out.”

Then, the details that go in behind the scenes with the mastering and the subtlety that goes on there – I’m really having some great success working with Howard Givens, who owns the Spotted Peccary label with partners. His whole setup is ultra high-end, analog front-end mastering tools. It’s making a big difference for me. I can hear it and I can see it in the response, also. So between Howard and Sam with that end of the production, we’ve got a great team, and I’m just really grateful to be working with those guys at this point.

If a younger artist in any field approaches you and asks for advice or even a simple suggestion about what to keep in mind for the future, what would be your response?

I would probably first ask them questions about their creative process to get a sense of what it is that they’re drawn to, what they’re aiming to express. Then I would have to ask them if they’re coming to me and they’re interested in what I’m doing, regardless of their age or my age, or just the art form itself. I would share the techniques that we’ve talked about in this interview thus far, and I would talk about their connection to yourself as a person before you approach any instrument or any tool. It’s just getting your intention and your clarity and getting a wide view of what it is you’re wanting to express.

Even if you don’t quite understand it enough to articulate it with words, finding that emotional landscape to draw from, and then trying to stay connected to what really feels right for you, for the artist, rather than being seduced by all the newest, most recent innovations in technology or the flavor-of-the-month stuff. I know it’s quite affordable, and you can build a whole studio’s worth of material inside of a MacBook Pro, but it doesn’t take much to bring in a few hardware pieces that just give you that hands-on subtlety. Really listen and draw from the things that inspire you. It could be musically or non-musically, but find the pulse inside of that.

I just also remind younger listeners when they respond to some of my classic titles like Structures or Dreamtime that those were all created on what would be considered very archaic, very simple equipment at that time. There’s this sense that I wanted to defy the technology all the way along. It really didn’t matter what I was using; I would use things that people would come back around and say, “You used that? To create that? Recorded that on a four-track or a cassette player?” I have a lot of pieces that were recorded on a Nakamichi cassette player, and captured at that level. That’s basically the multifaceted question towards a younger composer of today.

Mar 11

LYCIA: A LINE THAT CONNECTS (2LP/CD/TSHIRT) (preOrder)

LYCIA: A LINE THAT CONNECTS. LP, CD + Silver Leaf Tshirt. Taking preOrders now. The out-of-print 2015 album, back in print May 31st on Projekt Records! Download today at Bandcamp.

Lycia’s A Line That Connects returns on CD (and for the first time on 2LP) on Projekt Records. Originally released in the summer of 2015 on Handmade Birds, ALTC’s first pressing of 500 CDs quickly sold out. Haunting, bleak, moody and atmospheric, their 10th album is a heavy record with shifting sonics and a full-band sound thanks to a return to the classic mid-90s Lycia lineup of Mike VanPortfleet, David Galas, and Tara Vanflower. It’s a contemporary sounding release that harkens back to their 90s darkwave roots. Lycia’s mix of post-punk bleakness and doomy darkness is an engaging, fascinating listen.

CD — 4-panel digipak. Limited edition of 1000. 2LP — 140-gram color vinyl — Translucent blue with black smoke. 24pt gatefold jacket. Limited edition of 500. LYCIA | 4 — 4CD HARDBOX SET — 2010’s Fifth Sun*, 2013’s Quiet Moments*, 2015’s A Line That Connects, and 2018’s In Flickers. * these two CDs are available only in the box! T-SHIRT — Silver ink, Projekt logo on back

Purchase in Europe for fast, inexpensive shipping: Information in English here. Click to order CD or LP. T-shirts are available from the US webstore only. Also getting a reprint, currently on preOrder: T-shirts from IN FLICKERS and IONIA.

An article from post-punk.com

Sep 24

Exclusive! Listen to the new LYCIA track, “Rewrite”

October 26th is the estimated ship date for LYCIA’s new Projekt release, In Flickers. While you’re waiting on your copy, preview the track “Rewrite” at CVLTNation.

LYCIA: In Flickers

CD/LP/T-shirt at Projekt’s website or CD/LP/Download at Projekt’s Bandcamp page or for our European shoppers, CD/LP at Projekt’s European Webstore the Lycia LPs are limited editions of 150 per style, and they are selling quickly!

Sep 12

Dead Can Dance: Dionysus (in 3 formats)

Please note this release is not on Projekt; it’s an item we are stocking in our webstore. We don’t have promo copies.

Dead Can Dance return this November with Dionysus, their first album in 6 years. Projekt is taking preOrders on the CD, LP, and CD/LP-Book edition. The album is described as “seven movements representing different facets of the Dionysus myth and his cult.” Lisa Gerrard (who is currently on tour in promotion of her album with The Mystery Of The Bulgarian Voices | available from Projekt here), sings on 4 of the seven movements featured on the new Dead Can Dance album. At the heart of Dionysus is a celebration of not just humanity but humanity working hand in hand with nature with respect and appreciation.

A full list of all Lisa Gerrard albums available from the Projekt webstore.

Also on preOrder in the webstore:

Black Tape For A Blue Girl:  Remnants of a deeper purity 2CD/2LP/Shirt

Black Tape For A Blue Girl:  To touch the milky way CD/LP

LYCIA: In Flickers CD/LP/Shirt

Sep 09

Lycia: In Flickers /// Black Tape For A Blue Girl: To touch the milky way –and– Remnants of a deeper purity 2LP vinyl

  

Look at this! Two of Projekt’s biggest mid-90s band are releasing new albums (And yes, that’s right! LYCIA is back on Projekt.) We’re about two months away from the release of LYCIA’s In Flickers and Black Tape For A Blue Girl’s To touch the milky way. These new releases are available for preOrder. We also have a T-shirt for In Flickers. And now on preOrder, the repressing of Black Tape For A Blue Girl’s 2LP Remnants of a deeper purity  with a T-shirt option.

There’s bundle pricing at the Projekt website. These 3 releases (minus the shirts) kick off our collaboration with Projekt’s European webstore (more details below).

Here are links to preOrder

LYCIA: In Flickers  CD/LP/T-shirt at Projekt’s website or CD/LP/Download at Projekt’s Bandcamp page or for our European shoppers, CD/LP at Projekt’s European Webstore the Lycia LPs are limited editions of 150 per style, and they are selling quickly!

Black Tape For A Blue Girl: To touch the milky way CD/LP at Projekt’s website or CD/LP/Download at Black tape for a blue girl’s Bandcamp page or for our European shoppers, CD/LP at Projekt’s European Webstore Limited edition of 300, half reserved for the Kickstarter backers.

Black Tape For A Blue Girl: 2LP Remnants of a deeper purity  2LP/CD/T-shirt at Projekt’s website or CD/LP at Black Tape For A Blue Girl’s Bandcamp page or for our European shoppers, CD/LP at Projekt’s European Webstore< Limited edition of 150.

Shipping late October

 

 

 

Read about Projekt’s European website, here. The two main benefits for our European shoppers:

great shipping rates: GERMAN customers: flat € 1.99 shipping rate for all parcels – regardless of quantity ordered. EU customers: € 4.99 up to 500g; € 7.99 for up to 1000g (1 Kilo)

fast delivery< Orders placed weekdays before 2pm ship the same day

jarguna and Friends: TRAPPED Vol. 2 is name-your-price at Bandcamp. jarguna is Italian sound-artist Marco Billi: ethno-organic-ambient-electronic music in a mandala-like hymn to ethnic, tribal, ritual music. It’s a journey of sounds, feelings, contrasts, acoustics and electronics. From the first recordings in 1998, jarguna releases its 24th effort TRAPPED, a collaboration with like-minded creators.

Marco edited a video with excerpts from the album, and images of his collaborators. Watch it at YouTube.<

Sam comments: “Watching this video I’m struck by the dedication with which all of us musicians work to create the interesting sounds we imagine inside of our head. All the things we accumulate — the instruments, the recording gear, the keyboards, the gongs… the expenses! — to make something amazing for you, our listeners. It’s very wonderful to see your collaborators, jarguna!”

>thanks for supporting independent music

Aug 03

Steve Roach live on SomaFM :: two new albums from Steve

Steve Roach live on SomaFM for a worldwide audience this Saturday and Sunday

This weekend Steve performs two sold out shows in Santa Fe, NM. Both concerts will be broadcast live on SomaFM’s Space Station Soma at 8pm Mountain Time (7pm Pacific; 10pm Eastern). Pre and post show will be on SomaFM Live starting an hour before.

Steve says, “These Return To The Dreamtime concerts center around expanded and evolved pieces from Dreamtime Return. The set constantly emerges throughout the weekend, a breathing occurrence connected to the flow of the return to the dreamtime.”

(live photo above by Candice @ Journeyscapes Radio)

Return to the Dreamtime and Electron Birth

Two new albums on Steve’s Timeroom label available individually or in a $25 combo pack. Return to the Dreamtime (2CD $17) presents expanded and evolved pieces from Dreamtime Return, created live at the Galactic Center, Tucson AZ, Feb 10, 2018. Electron Birth (CD $14) is a mesmerizing masterpiece of multi-dimensional analog sequencer-spun music connecting directly to Steve’s passion for the interweaving of pure emotion, energy, delicate grace and driving flow.

pre-Order, estimated late-August shipping

 

jarguna and Friends: Trapped (on CD)

jarguna is Italian sound-artist Marco Billi: ethno-organic-ambient-electronic music in a mandala-like hymn to ethnic, tribal, ritual music. It’s a journey of sounds, feelings, contrasts, acoustics and electronics. TRAPPED Vol 1 and Vol 2 are collaborations with like-minded creators. These releases are limited edition run of 100 4-panel digipaks. These are CD-rs replicated at a pressing plant, not a CD run with a glassmaster.

pre-order: TRAPPED Vol 1 and Vol 2 $14 each.

Jul 13

Images from the Stark Corner – Lycia – an early 90s memory

From Projekt’s Sam Rosenthal:

There’s an ongoing fascination with 90s-era Projekt releases. For aficionados of those releases, here’s something really interesting! It’s a set of never-before-seen images from the photoshoot for one of Projekt’s iconic 90s albums! It’s been 24 years since the release of LYCIA’s A Day in the Stark Corner; back in 1993 Susan Jennings and I went out to the desert to shoot the cover photos. When I was redesigning the cover for the reissue, I asked Susan to digitize the 3 rolls of film we shot that day, 80 images in all. On this page you can see the progression of our ideas with 24 images in the order they were taken. All images are presented full frame (not cropped). I think it’s remarkable to peek into this moment in time in a way I didn’t think I would experience again. Enjoy!

If you have any questions you’d like to ask Susan and me, send a message; we’ll add your question and the answer to the page.

Today is the retail street date for the Stark Corner CD. Purchase at your favorite record store, Amazon, and of course at Projekt’s webstore and Bandcamp store.

A very limited number of the A Day in the Stark Corner t-shirts remain: 5 medium and 2 XL. We also have 2 of the 3-XL Ionia t-shirts.

On the follow-up to Ionia, Mike Van Portfleet continues his pursuit of an apocalyptic landscape of extremes in which rich gothic guitars and intense rhythms divulge a world of bleak desperation; with that unmistakeable unnerving whispered voice. Peter Steele of Type-O Negative said about Stark Corner: “Such simple hypnotic beats, everything is drowned in reverb. Yet, the emotion comes through so loud and clear. It’s just devastating, as beautiful as it is devastating.”

Jan 31

in the studio with Projekt’s Robert Logan

in the studio with Projekt’s Robert Logan

“Sovereign” – Listen at Bandcamp

Robert reflects, “‘Sovereign’ is a piece that seemed to compose itself over the course of a few months. It was partly inspired by the number of months I spent in Mozambique and something of the majesty of the land and people – as well as the music I encountered – influenced the entire composition. The piece utilises a large range of analog and digital synthesizers – including a custom ‘vocal’ synthesizer I created with vowel sounds to ‘sing’ the lead melodies that were played in – as well various kinds of hand percussion, vocal sounds, field recordings and much more besides. In the second half the music shifts and the opening melody returns, now feeling quite different against the new form the rest of the music has taken. The feeling that seems to be invoked in the second half is especially important; I’d describe it as ‘otherness.’ Japanese music also influenced this composition, particularly the ‘royal’ aspect of the ending.”

“The Weaver,” the fifth track on Robert Logan’s Sculptor Galaxy, was inspired by an enrapturing experience of the natural surroundings he encountered while working alone at his village studio in the Hungarian wilderness.

“The Weaver” – Listen at Bandcamp

Robert comments, “The weather patterns during the piece’s creation were wonderfully temperamental, with some incredible storms rolling in which shook the walls of the room where I created this music. But while those sounds and atmospheres did infiltrate the track’s formation, it was the unusual, wet stillness in the aftermath and quiet observations of plant life and intricate plantal sequences that particularly inspired the feeling behind the piece. Indeed, “The Weaver” has a somewhat different tonality to the rest of Sculptor Galaxy (even though the album is a continuous journey best heard as one long piece) in that it was written note-by-note in a microtonal 31-tone scale system, and an inspiration to its detailed interlocking threads was a book called The Algorithmic Beauty of Plants which explores the mathematical beauty and organisation of plant structures, along with minimalism/systems music. The piece’s dynamics flower in and out in rhythm to organic cycles.”

Robert Logan Sculptor Galaxy | CD for $14 at Projekt / Download for $10 at Bandcamp / Download for $9.99 at iTunes

Expose Online wrote: “(Robert Logan’s) disc takes the explorative route in lieu of the predictable, and for that I’m calling Sculptor Galaxy one of the best electronic based releases of (the year).”

After six solo electronic/ambient albums and his 2016 collaborations with Steve Roach (Biosonic and Second Nature, Projekt) Logan’s new album blends unusual electronic and acoustic sources, terraforming bright, melodic molten sound with an enraptured experience of the natural world. Vibrant electronic performances, detailed tone-sculpting, processed natural sounds (captures from Mozambique, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Hong Kong, Hungarian village life and the UK’s shores), and unusual acoustic instruments inform a musical world of exotic majesty and boundless adventure.

Jan 30

New release from Forrest Fang & Catalog Sale

Forrest Fang’s electronic creations are a surrealist blend of processed ethnic instruments and minimalist, ambient soundscapes. His new release, Scenes from a Ghost Train is in stores on February 2nd. We’ve put his catalog titles on sale through 1 am EST, Wednesday February 7th. Click here for a list of all titles.

Nov 29

Steve Roach nominated for GRAMMY

Click for the 2018 Steve Roach Bio

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Sonic innovator Steve Roach received a Grammy Award nomination for his inspired Spiral Revelation release! As one of the original architects of the ambient/electronic genre, Roach’s 40 years of creating genre-defying soundworld experiences immersed with vital life energy and passion has been recognized by the members of the Recording Academy in this Grammy nomination for “Best New Age Album.”

“Spiral Revelation stands out as a true, mind-tripping, trance inducing album. (It’s) a quintessential example of Roach’s sequencer driven oeuvre.” – John Diliberto, Echoes syndicated radio program

The 60th Grammy Awards will be held in New York City on January 28, 2018. For info: grammy.com

An emotional through-line brings life to Spiral Revelation as the unfurling of time’s windings connects to the vivid present, life-affirming and illuminated. The release is a masterful expression of an artist who has infused his soul into the art form of electronic music through years of dedication exploring sound via hands-on synthesis.

Purchase the album from Projekt.com, on sale for $10 Stream the album at Bandcamp Image downloads Longer bio (from 2018) |

Image Download

Downloadable Steve Roach image at Wikipedia by Linda Kohanov Additional Steve Roach images at the Projekt artist photo download page

Additional information on the artist, album & label

Steve Roach is a pioneer in the evolution of ambient/electronic music, shaping it into what it is today. The extremely prolific American artist has a discography of over 125 albums. Following his 1982 debut, landmark recordings include Structures from Silence, Dreamtime Return and 2017’s Grammy-nominated Spiral Revelation. Tireless in his creative focus, Roach constantly challenges boundaries in work ranging in style from rhythmic analog sequencer music, pure floating spaces, primordial tribal-ambient and long-form drift ambient. He brings to the table years of dedication and experience exploring sound via hands-on synthesis. With the sense of an artist working in three dimensional space, Steve creates a sonic experience that breathe power, passion and vital life energy.

Spiral Revelations. The sound of life, interconnected and unfurling. The spiral – a visual symbol of eternity – is a reoccurring metaphoric theme in Steve Roach’s pioneering electronic work. Interpreted into musical form, these six spiraling sonic experiences offer a living activation that connects with a sense of the infinite. Roach’s long history and love of analog sequencer-based styles reveal a continuing, evolving awakening within Spiral Revelation’s 63 minutes. Focussing the mind’s ear upon a filigree of intricate patterns woven with a direct hands-on approach, the artist sculpts and caresses sound into being in real time. An emotional through-line brings life to these pieces as the unfurling of time’s windings connects to the vivid present, life-affirming and illuminated. A masterful expression of an artist who has infused his soul into the art form of electronic music.

Projekt is a Portland, Oregon-based independent record label that specializes in electronic, ambient, gothic and darkwave, started by Sam Rosenthal in 1983. Prominent Projekt artists include Rosenthal’s own Black Tape for a Blue Girl, Steve Roach, Eric Wollo, Voltaire and Lycia. With over 350 releases, it is one of America’s longest running independently-owned recording labels specializing in the electronic music genre.

Recent press on Steve’s Grammy nomination

musictap.com synthtopia.com Echoes Radio. John Diliberto writes: Steve Roach tops this excellent 2017 Grammy New Age cast. Spiral Revelation stands out as a true, mind-tripping, trance inducing album. Roach has been recording since the early 1980s, he’s approaching 200 releases, and he’s one of the first names mentioned in certain areas of electronic music. But he’s never been nominated for a Grammy award. But this year, through some quirk of coincidence, talent, artistry and persistence, he’s broken in with Spiral Revelation, a quintessential example of Roach’s sequencer driven oeuvre.

Downloadable Spiral poster

Download a free 11×17 poster at http://www.projekt.com/Posters/PRO336-Poster.jpg . Print it on your color printer, or at a local printshop. And please email a photo of the poster at work, at home, etc, and we’ll post your photos on Steve’s Facebook Page.